Author, Editor, Publisher

Tag: warehouse (Page 1 of 2)

When Shipping Goes Horribly Wrong (Part Two)

Last month, our wonderful printer called us about the arrival of the slipcases for The Dark Man by Stephen King, which had shipped to them directly from our slipcase maker.

They wanted to let us know that a few cartons appeared to have been damaged in transit. That’s not the end of the world, it happens from time to time, and the damage didn’t look too bad.

Then they called back a few minutes later because they realized that the slipcase maker had shipped three pallets… and FOUR pallets had arrived.

We hadn’t mysteriously gained more slipcases in transit, of course. The extra pallet was all of the cartons that had been ripped off their original pallet somewhere along the way.

There was much more damage than originally realized, but luckily, there were just enough extra slipcases produced so that all of the books in the 5,000 copy run of The Dark Man would have one… but it was close!

The Dark Man Slipcase Damage

The Dark Man Slipcase Damage

The Dark Man Slipcase Damage

The Dark Man Slipcase Damage

When Shipping Goes Horribly Wrong (Part One)

A Gaylord shipping container (or “bulk box”) is basically a giant cardboard box with a lid for shipping a bulk product on a pallet. Here’s what they look like:

Tin House Summer IssueWe’ve seen them before at other warehouses, but it’s not how products are shipped to us. At least not normally.

A few weeks ago, another publisher’s distributor accidentally shipped 450 copies of their publication to us in a Gaylord.

And this is how they arrived:

Tin House Summer Issue

Tin House Summer Issue

Tin House Summer Issue

The cherry on top of this mess were the copies with boot prints, which told us that the container had spilled open somewhere in transit:

Tin House Summer Issue

The publisher was horrified to see how the copies arrived, of course, and quickly replaced them, but it was a surprising way to start the day!

Awaiting the Arrival of The Dark Man by Stephen King

We have a secondary warehouse attached to our main office/warehouse space that we use for long-term storage and managing the bigger projects that require a lot of floor space. Dan took part of this morning to make room for the arrival of the trade editions of The Dark Man by Stephen King, which will be here by the end of the week:

The Cemetery Dance Warehouse

Scenes from the Cemetery Dance office: Something Odd Happened Today

Today’s “Scene from the Cemetery Dance Office” requires an introduction. Kate and I were at the office alone this afternoon while everyone else was out to lunch. The Post Office truck showed up for their daily pick-up, so we opened the big warehouse dock door, something we’ve done thousands of times over the last 10 years. Only something happened this time that has never happened before.

A few years ago, at the back of the warehouse, around the corner from the main floor, we mounted a basketball game from the top of the mezzanine. Do you know the kind of game I mean? There’s a basketball hoop with a backboard, and embedded in the backboard is a scoreboard and a timer. The game keeps track of how many shots Player A sinks in 30 seconds, then Player B takes a turn and tries to beat that score. We played this game a lot during the first six months we had it, to the point that we kept a sheet with “records” like “most points in 30 seconds” and “longest shot made,” etc. Although the game is still plugged in, it hasn’t been turned on and played in ages.

Well, today, when that warehouse door rolled up, the game suddenly turned on all by itself. We hadn’t heard the game’s musical chimes in so long that we didn’t even realize what had happened at first. Kate thought it was a noise from the truck and I thought the office’s alarm system had somehow been tripped, which means you have a few seconds to enter the code before all of the sirens go off and the cops show up.

Then we heard a very familiar sound: the special chime that indicates a shot has been sunk and a point awarded. Only the game didn’t chime once, it was chiming over and over, faster and faster.

By the time I got around the corner, the 30 seconds was up and Player A’s game was over. But the score definitely beat all of our records from years ago:

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